HIGH PERFORMANCE WEST

WOTD

Workout of the Day

 Neil Seibert (2nd from right, grey top) was as promising a miler Portland State has seen in the past decade. 

Neil Seibert (2nd from right, grey top) was as promising a miler Portland State has seen in the past decade. 

2 x (4 x 300m, 4 x 200m)

Splits: 

300m, Set #1: 48.7 / 48.1 / 47.8 49.6
200m, Set #1: 31.2 / 30.6 /30.8 30.2
300m, Set #2: 49.7 / 48.6 / 48.8 47.2
200m, Set #2: 30.8 / 30.9 /30.6 28.8

Recovery: 200m jog between 300m reps. 100m jog between 200m reps. 400m jog between sets

Neil Seibert — April 25th, 2013

 

Context & Details 

At the time of this workout, Neil was a true freshman at Portland State. He ran low 4 minutes for the 1500m in high school and had progressed to a capable miler at PSU, that year running his way onto the school's all-time Top 10 list in the event.

I designed this session to reinforce the theme of critical race speeds which Neil had been working on all year. The 300m reps were at date 1500m race pace and the 200m reps at 1 second per 200m faster than 1500m race pace. The short rest intervals are the deciding element to this session, not the times ran. The rep to rest ratio was roughly 1:1 within each set of work, making for progressively incomplete recovery, resulting in the final two reps of each set being inescapably honest efforts. 

For Neil, the ask was the 300m at 48" and the 200m at 31". He had the Big Sky Outdoor conference meet coming up in roughly 2.5 weeks, and this was one of his final difficult sessions which I thought would have a positive impact on his fitness for the forthcoming championships. I wanted to focus exclusively on 1500m race speeds and slightly faster, so he was sharply familiar with the speed of play for his event. To be competitive there, he needed to focus all of his thinking power on tactics and execution rather than physical discomfort. The mile is an unforgiving event, and it takes a special breed to run it well.

He handled the day's task well. I remember the final few 300m reps demanded his full focus and attention, but the 200m reps zipped by — he was blessed with good natural foot speed for a young miler. He clocked a 28.8 for his final rep. He didn't have to, I gave no instruction to open up. But he did. A classic miler move. 

Neil was showing promise he might, in fact, be that special breed. 

Any questions? I'm happy to answer. You can send me a Direct Message on Twitter or email me at jmarcus.hpw@gmail.com
Thx //  jm

Jonathan Marcus