HIGH PERFORMANCE WEST

Daily Blog

Play the Game vs. Change the Game

 Eleanor Fulton (left) and McKayla Fricker (right) are no strangers to change. It is a trusted ally which has afforded them to become what they are today; better than yesterday.

Eleanor Fulton (left) and McKayla Fricker (right) are no strangers to change. It is a trusted ally which has afforded them to become what they are today; better than yesterday.

It is important to be clear about which type of model you're electing to use when participating in the game.

The default model is to accept the established rules. Learn them. Understand how to play by them. Observe others. Record who wins. Who loses. Their methods. And then copy the approach of the successful. Discard the strategies of the failures. 

This is the choice of most in each arena of life. Athletics. Business. Art. Life. You name it. The attitude here is, "l can't change the rules to the game. And I want to be accepted. So I will walk the exact path of my famous idol and my success will be assured." But this is a false path.

It is shallow reductionist logic at work. It is incomplete. And typically ends in the failure and rejection due to failure which was sought to be avoided in the first place. 

There is an alternative: Change the Game. 

Change the rules. Change what you keep score of. Change your attitude. Change your technique. Change yourself. Change others. Change the world around you. 

Gandhi was reported to have said: 'Be the change you wish to see in the world." This sentiment is correct, strong, and rings true. Only, Gandhi never said those exact words

What he did say is more powerful: 

“If we could change ourselves, the tendencies in the world would also change. As a man changes his own nature, so does the attitude of the world change towards him. ... We need not wait to see what others do.”

Now re-read this entire blog post and substitute "progress" for the word "change."

Jonathan Marcus